InterfaceAddict-ed

Examining the material with no form

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hautepop:

Energy Addicts by Naomi Kizhner

An invasive jewellery collection that converts kinetic energy from the body’s involuntary movements into electricity.

How can we as human bodies become a natural resource?

From Dezeen:

Naomi Kizhner designed the Energy Addicts accessories in response to the world’s impending energy crisis, looking for an existing energy source that is yet to be tapped in to.

"It interested me to imagine what would the world be like once it has experienced a steep decline in energy resources and how we will feed our energy addiction," Kizhner told Dezeen. "There are lots of developments of renewable energy resources, but the human body is a natural resource for energy that is constantly renewed, as long as we are alive."

"I wanted to explore the post-humanistic approach that sees the human body as a resource," she added.

The pieces would be embedded into the surface of the skin to capture the energy of subconscious movements, such as the flow of blood through the veins and blinking, transforming it into a useable energy resource.

Read more at Dezeen
Artist’s website: NaomiKizhiner.com (video, but text in Hebrew)

Filed under wearables as art

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Jason Dorrier, Burger Robot Poised to Disrupt Fast Food Industry
I saw the future of work in a San Francisco garage two years ago. Or rather, I was in proximity to the future of work, but happened to be looking the other direction. At the time, I was visiting a space startup building satellites behind a carport. But just behind them—a robot was cooking up burgers. The inventors of the burger device? Momentum Machines, and they’re serious about fast food productivity. “Our device isn’t meant to make employees more efficient,” cofounder Alexandros Vardakostas has said. “It’s meant to completely obviate them.” The Momentum burger-bot isn’t remotely humanoid. You can forget visions of Futurama’s Bender. It’s more of a burger assembly line. Ingredients are stored in automated containers along the line. Instead of pre-prepared veggies, cheese, and ground beef—the bot chars, slices, dices, and assembles it all fresh. Why would talented engineers schooled at Berkeley, Stanford, UCSB, and USC with experience at Tesla and NASA bother with burger-bots? Robots are increasingly capable of jobs once thought the sole domain of humans—and that’s a huge opportunity. Burger robots may improve consistency and sanitation, and they can knock out a rush like nobody’s business. Momentum’s robot can make a burger in 10 seconds (360/hr). Fast yes, but also superior quality. Because the restaurant is free to spend its savings on better ingredients, it can make gourmet burgers at fast food prices. Or at least, that’s the idea.
Jason Dorrier, Burger Robot Poised to Disrupt Fast Food Industry

I saw the future of work in a San Francisco garage two years ago. Or rather, I was in proximity to the future of work, but happened to be looking the other direction. At the time, I was visiting a space startup building satellites behind a carport. But just behind them—a robot was cooking up burgers. The inventors of the burger device? Momentum Machines, and they’re serious about fast food productivity. “Our device isn’t meant to make employees more efficient,” cofounder Alexandros Vardakostas has said. “It’s meant to completely obviate them.” The Momentum burger-bot isn’t remotely humanoid. You can forget visions of Futurama’s Bender. It’s more of a burger assembly line. Ingredients are stored in automated containers along the line. Instead of pre-prepared veggies, cheese, and ground beef—the bot chars, slices, dices, and assembles it all fresh. Why would talented engineers schooled at Berkeley, Stanford, UCSB, and USC with experience at Tesla and NASA bother with burger-bots? Robots are increasingly capable of jobs once thought the sole domain of humans—and that’s a huge opportunity. Burger robots may improve consistency and sanitation, and they can knock out a rush like nobody’s business. Momentum’s robot can make a burger in 10 seconds (360/hr). Fast yes, but also superior quality. Because the restaurant is free to spend its savings on better ingredients, it can make gourmet burgers at fast food prices. Or at least, that’s the idea.

(via emergentfutures)

Filed under does it matter and do we care burgers robots

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Designing Elderly Digital Games: A Checklist

Source: Digital Game Design for Elderly Users (Isselsteijn, Nap, Kort & Poels, 2007)

1. Allow user easy control of font, color, and contrast settings, for example, to aid the user in controlling the visual environment

2. Avoid synthetic speech, user lower frequency tones, and support it with other channels of feedback, such as vibration.

3. Avoid small targets and moving interface elements as motor impairment may reduce the ability to steady the pointer or track moving objects

4. Rely more on recognition and less on recall, to support reduced compromised short term memory processes.

5. Decrease anxiety by increasing feedback and allowing for early successes

6. Increase training time and decrease size of incremental learning steps to scaffold training process.

7. Offer content that seniors will appreciate and want to engage with.

Filed under elder games design of games gaming elderly design